Janet Laughead BHHS Commonwealth Wellesley MA



 Photo by Ulrike Mai via Pixabay

Moving from one state to another is stressful enough for adults and children. Often pets are doubly confused. Your home may be the only world they've known. They don't understand why you're leaving or if you're coming back. Boxes are piling up and moving people, family and friends are everywhere. This may increase your pet's anxiety and find them acting out or running away more than usual.

We've compiled five of the best expert tips for moving cross-country with your pet.

1. Prepare yourself for the move

We love this one from the New York Times. Often pets pick up on your own frazzled, sad or angry emotions. If you're frantically sorting boxes or searching for items, your pet will feel equally frustrated.

If this move is causing you stress, take time to slow down and do something you love. Remember, this is temporary. Whether it's an upgrade or a downsize, you're going to love your new home.

2. Put them in a quiet room

All the boxes, shifting furniture and people are disorienting. On top of that, the front door may be propped open for extended periods. Put your pet in a room as far from the commotion as possible. If they're prone to gnawing or scratching, put them in a crate and play some white noise, pleasant music or a TV program they'll associate with you to ease the stress.

3. Acclimate your pet to their carrier

If your pet is afraid of the carrier they'll travel in, leave it out in the room for a few weeks before your move. They can walk in and out of it on their own and know that it's not a trap. Put some treats and a blanket they love in there. Help them make positive associations with that safe traveling crate.

4. Assess the new surroundings 

If you're moving cross country, you may encounter unfamiliar hazards like:

  • Poisonous plants
  • Feral animals
  • Busy streets close to your home
  • Rat traps or bug-control pellets

You know your pet best and what may be a risk to them. Inspecting for hazards will help you prepare for their safe arrival.

5. Let them adjust slowly

Don't give your pets a whole new world to explore all at once. Instead, start them in one room like a laundry room or bathroom with food, water, bed and litter box (if applicable). Spend a few hours with them there. Then introduce them to the rest of their new home.

For more tips on moving, buying and selling your home, follow our blog.


Ready to pack your clothing for moving day? Ultimately, packing apparel and accessories can be a hassle, particularly for those who have only a limited amount of time to prepare for a move. Lucky for you, we're here to help streamline the process of getting your clothing ready for moving day.

Now, let's take a look at three tips for packing clothing before moving day arrives.

1. Sort Through Your Clothing

Take a look inside your closet and sort through your apparel and accessories – you'll be glad you did. If you organize your clothing today, you may be able to save time down the line.

Determine which clothing you plan to keep and which no longer suits your style. Then, you can eliminate assorted apparel and accessories from your wardrobe.

With excess clothes that are in good condition, you may be able to sell or donate these items. Before you do so, however, you should make sure that all of your clothing is clean.

If you find clothes that are ripped or torn, there is no need to bring them to your new address. Instead, dispose of any damaged clothes, and you can avoid the hassle of transporting these items from Point A to Point B.

2. Group Your Clothing

Group your clothing, and you can organize your apparel and accessories and speed up the process of unpacking your clothing once you reach your new address.

There are many ways that you can group apparel and accessories. Some people choose to group clothing by season. Or, you may want to group your clothing by material or purpose.

Regardless of how you group your clothes, you'll want to label moving boxes that contain clothing accordingly. This will ensure that you can instantly locate your clothing after your move and start unpacking your apparel and accessories right away.

3. Consider What You'll Wear on Moving Day

Although you'll want to pack as much as possible prior to moving day, you should put aside clothing that you intend to wear on moving day.

It often pays to pack clothing as close to moving day as you can. That way, you can keep a close eye on the weather forecast and ensure you can put aside appropriate apparel and accessories for moving day.

Furthermore, if you're moving in summertime, you may want to set aside a pair of sunglasses and hat for maximum sun protection. On the other hand, you may want to keep a pair of winter gloves and other seasonal accessories on hand if you're preparing for a winter move.

If you need extra help getting ready for moving day, you may want to consult with a real estate agent. This housing market professional can offer honest, unbiased recommendations to help you prepare your clothing and other belongings for your upcoming move.

Use the aforementioned moving tips, and you should have no trouble packing all of your clothing prior to moving day.


Moving day; you’ve waited months for this day to arrive, working hard to make sure you, your family, pets, and belongings are ready for the big move.

With all of the preparations and various people involved, it’s easy for moving day to become dangerous.

To ensure that you and your family have a safe and smooth moving day, I’ve provided some tips that every mover should keep in mind.

Make plans for pets and young children

The last thing you want on the first day in your new home is to be wandering around the neighborhood looking for your dog who slipped away during the move. If possible, make arrangements for pets to stay with friends or family for moving day to make things easier.

If you need to bring your pets along, it’s a good idea to put them in a “playroom” with their toys, water bowl, etc. while you have the door to the house open. Not only will it stop them from running out, but it will also prevent you from tripping over them while you carry the couch.

Don’t be a hero

It’s our tendency to want to do a job ourselves if we want it done right. But, when it comes to moving, that philosophy can lead to a thrown out back and a damper on your plans.

When it comes to getting large and heavy objects in and out of the house, make sure you have at least one other person ready to lift with you.

Stack from heaviest to lightest

It may seem obvious, but in the confusion of a move, it can be easy to pack your truck or van in a less-than-ideal way. Rather than playing Tetris with your boxes, try to focus on weight instead. You don’t want heavy boxes near the roof in case they fall on you or on your other belongings.

Place the largest and heavier items in the van first. This will allow you to plan the rest of the load around them, rather than having to move them around to make room.

Take a breather

As tempting as it may be, you don’t have to finish everything in one day. As long as your truck is locked and secure, it’s okay if you don’t bring in every single box. Resting throughout the day and staying hydrated, especially when moving in the summer, will help you stay sharp and ready to keep working.

Have an emergency plan

If you take precautions, you most likely won’t have to worry about emergencies. However, accidents do happen and it’s best to be prepared for them when they do. If you or a family member requires medication, make sure it’s handy and that everyone knows where it is.

Similarly, label your first aid kit and keep it with your necessities during the move.


If you follow these tips, your moving day should be a simple and safe process and you’ll be enjoying your new home in no time.


There was a time when moving across the country was a trip into the unknown. For some, that prospect may be an exciting one. For a homeowner with bills to pay or children to raise, the more you know about a place the better.

Fortunately, today’s technology equips us with tools to learn everything (or almost everything) we need to know about a place without ever visiting. With the use of statistics, maps, and first-hand accounts, would-be homeowners can put in their researcher hats and get a feel for a place without ever even visiting.

In today’s post, I’m going to introduce you to some of those tools. So, if you’re thinking of making a long distance move sometime in the near future, read on for a list of the most useful resources that will help you along your search.

Cost of living

Most of us would love to move to Hawaii or San Francisco, but let’s face it--cost of living differences can make a huge impact on our ability to move wherever we want. Fortunately, there is reliable data on the specific cost of living for different parts of the United States.

Nerdwallet’s cost of living calculator lets you enter your current city and income and then compare what you would need to earn (on average) to move to a city of your choice. Moving to Boston, MA from Denver, CO, for example, would mean a 34% increase in costs like housing, groceries, transportation, etc.

Do you freelance or work from home and have the ability to travel wherever you want? If so, check out the Nomad List. It lets you compare housing costs, safety, weather, and--perhaps most important for freelancers--internet speeds in cities around the country and around the world.

How’s the weather?

Another important consideration for long distance moves is the climate. Not only will it determine your wardrobe and comfort level, but it also could mean more expensive heating in the winter or air conditioning in the winter.

To check out the average monthly temperatures and precipitation levels, check out U.S. Climate Data.

School scores

It’s hard to judge schools based on a few numbers, and it’s best to see what kind of programs and classes they’ll offer for your children as well. However, to get a glimpse of the nearby schools, you can check out City Data or NeighborhoodScout.

Safety

Safety is always a concern when visiting or moving to a new place. Fortunately, there are several good sources of information for neighborhood safety.

When we think of safety, most of us think of things like crime rates. NeighborhoodScout provides all the data you’ll need on crime. However, there are other safety concerns that should be addressed.

The CDC provides health data for 500 U.S. Cities. And, if you’re worried about lead exposure, this interactive map from Reuters has you covered.


Photo by bruce mars from Pexels

Moving locally might not seem as stressful as a long-distance move, but it can still be hectic if you’re not well-prepared for it. Whether your local move is just down the street or to another part of town, make sure you start getting ready for it early. The following tips can help make your upcoming move a bit easier. 

Start Sorting & Packing Early

Even though it won’t take as long to get to your new home when you move a short distance, you should still get started on sorting and packing your belongings as early as you can. Waiting to begin may mean you’ll feel rushed and opt to skip the sorting process. Instead of donating or tossing items in order to downsize, for example, you might end up bringing everything with you to your new home. If you’ve closed on your new home and know your moving date, you can begin sorting through your household items. 

Label Your Boxes

Being as organized as possible can help your local move go smoothly. As you go through your belongings and pack them up, put labels on each box or container. Your labels should let you know what’s inside and where each box or container should go. You can either write the room on the label or use color-coded labels for different rooms. Having all of your boxes and containers clearly marked makes it easy for you or your movers to know where to put them at your new home. 

Switch Your Utilities

As your move gets closer, keep in mind that you’ll need to change your utilities over to your new home. Since you’re moving locally, you might not have to deal with switching to new utility companies. Instead, you might just have to contact each company to provide them with your new address and let them know when to shut off services at your current home and turn them on at your new home. 

Make Multiple Trips

Since your new home isn’t far away, you should be able to make several trips back and forth instead of having to move everything in one trip. You can load up your car with smaller items and boxes for these trips, and unload them in your new residence. For larger items, such as your furniture, make plans to rent a truck or hire local movers to handle these for you. Moving into your new home a little at a time through multiple trips helps make your actual moving day less stressful overall.




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